fbpx

Compare Listings

Where to buy in Sydney when money is no object

Where to buy in Sydney when money is no object

By Hamish McDougall

What a fabulous problem, to have so many harbourfront vantages to choose from…

Sydney routinely ranks among the world’s most liveable cities, with its trifecta of culture, commerce and climate – but it’s the glittering harbour views and glamorous waterfront real estate that leave the competition for dead.

So which facet of the Emerald City should you be eyeing off? We present five of the most sought-after suburbs where both local and overseas buyers vie for some of the world’s most extraordinary properties.


North Shore: Cremorne, Clifton Gardens

Cremorne Point harbour views
The view from Cremorne Point

The harbourfront suburbs of the North Shore offer secluded, family-friendly living with among the best views Sydney has to offer. Federation-era houses (dating back to the 1900s) rub shoulders with lavish modern builds and a sprinkling of medium-rise apartments. Attractions include endless waterfront trails, the Mosman / Military Road shopping and dining precinct, Balmoral Beach and Taronga Zoo.

WHO: Families
WHERE: Milson Road, Kuraba Road, Musgrave Street, Raglan Street
WHY: Postcard views of Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Opera House and city; quiet suburban living with a ferry into town when you need it


Inner West: Pyrmont, Ultimo

Right on the city fringe and within a short walk of Darling Harbour’s nightlife, attractions and casino, as well as the famous Sydney Fish Market, Pyrmont and Ultimo are among the most built-up suburban areas of Sydney, offering few landed properties – but also some of the top apartments buildings on the market (such as One Central Park, above). Pyrmont may have the views, but Ultimo boasts the university access.

WHO: Young professionals, students
WHERE: Pirrama Road, Sydney Wharf Apartments, Goldsbrough and One Central Park condos
WHY: Close to city and universities; cafes, shops and parks galore; stunning harbour, city and bridge views from Pyrmont


City beaches: Bondi, Bronte

Killer views from North Bondi’s low-rise apartments

Sydney’s beaches need little introduction. A 25-minute drive from the city (which is considered short here), Bondi is globally renowned and draws tourists, holiday home-owners and locals in droves. Less well known, and in some ways even lovelier, are the neighbouring beaches of Tamarama and Bronte, below – which are quieter, with less dining and nightlife, but just as picturesque.

WHO: Professionals, young families
WHERE: Ramsgate Avenue, Bronte Road, The Pacific condo
WHY: Work-life balance doesn’t get any better than having the world’s most recognisable city beaches right outside your window


Sydney City: Circular Quay, Hyde Park

Sydney city property

Sydney’s CBD is by no means a residential hub, but the few apartment buildings within its limits tend to be big on wowfactor: international architects, luxurious interiors, stunning views. There’s also a wide variety on offer, from neighbouring the Opera House at Circular Quay, to panoramic Botanic Gardens views from Macquarie Street, to Manhattan-style living on Hyde Park or Clarence Street.

WHO: Out of towners
WHERE: Bennelong Apartments, Aurora Place, The Residence Hyde Park, Arc by Crown
WHY: When you need a pied-à-terre with city, park and harbour views – plus dining and drinks on your doorstep


Eastern Suburbs: Vaucluse, Darling Point

Positioned between Bondi and the city, and boasting among the best views of the harbour – with prized north-facing aspects – the Eastern Suburbs represent the top shelf of Sydney property. Stretching from Darling Point and Point Piper through to Rose Bay, Vaucluse and Watson’s Bay, this area claims some of Sydney’s ultimate properties and record-setting prices, with absolute waterfront and mooring at the top of the pile.

WHO: Sydney’s (and the world’s) elite
WHERE: New Beach Road, Wolseley Road, Carrara Road, Vaucluse Road
WHY: Trophy properties; among the most coveted views in the world; somewhere to park your yacht


Where to now?

By Hamish McDougall

Join The Discussion